35
October 04, 2012 | {category_name}

Cocktail Blogging is Dead

There, I said it. Actually it was pointed out to me by SeanMike on Twitter that I have been saying this since 2010 at the first Portland Cocktail week. Before I said it, Rick Dobbs prophesied it back in 2008. Let's say the writing was on the wall and today the coroner is just about to sign the death certificate. Does this mean cocktail blogs are finished? No, but the golden days are gone. "What happened?" you may ask. Let me explain and it is more complex than simple apathy.

I've been sitting on this post for over a year. Standing on a soap box, proclaiming the end of something, isn't my style, at least not sober. However, there has been some discussion on Twitter and other mediums, like personal conversations (imagine that) which have convinced me that a post mortem needs to be completed.

Blogging isn't really dead, certain categories do very well like technology sites, however the cocktail blog is dead or not near as influential as they once were. There are a number of valid reasons for this, but first some inspiration for this post.

In the past few years the term "blogger" has gone from descriptive to derogatory. If you've watched the movie Contagion (2011), the villain isn't the virus, it's a blogger. At one point in the movie a character defines a blog as "graffiti with punctuation". Matthew Rowley (Whiskey Forge) described being introduced as a blogger at an event, only to receive looks of pity.  Ouch. Whenever you want to throw a writer under the bus, say this: "You are just a blogger."

Angus Winchester, in a Twitter discussion about a certain spirit, stated to someone "I am not surprised you are a fan as they gave it to you free. And you are a blogger." The implications of such a statement are that bloggers are in a subservient relationship with spirit companies and merely post glowing reviews for free samples.

Twitter is not the proper medium for intelligent debate and Angus is a decent guy so I'll cut him some slack. Angus did offer a sort of Romney-esque mea culpa with this Twitter broadcast: "To Bloggers everywhere. I don't think you all suck by any means but there are far more bad ones than good. More so than traditional media." I wonder if this post puts me in the sucks column? Maybe I was already there, who knows. The point is, when people make blanket statements like "you are just a blogger" it casts doubt on the credibility of all bloggers.

Do most cocktail blogs suck? I don't think so. Personally I feel that all of the "low hanging fruit" as been plucked and discussed ad nauseam. How many times can we talk about the Manhattan cocktail or other mainstream cocktail that contains three ingredients and keep it interesting? The reality is we can't, so bloggers always need to find new and interesting things to talk about. New bloggers make the mistake of thinking they are joining an ongoing conversation, adding their opinion, but those discussions have long ago reached a conclusion.

As topics get more indepth, we hit a threshold where people can't justify the amount of time required to research and write a post. It also means that if you truly love this topic, you might as well ditch the blog and write professionally (i.e. get a pay cheque). That's what Paul Clarke did.

If there was a way to monetenize cocktail blogs they might be more successful, however due to the nature of the topic (alcohol) there are advertising barriers (DISCUS) that other topics don't have to deal with. From experience I can say it is extremely difficult to get decent advertising income from a cocktail blog. Aside from advertising laws, most spirit companies can't be bothered to put money into blogs because they want big numbers (millions of visitors) and hardcore analytics. This cocktail community isn't nearly that big and delving into analytical visitor data for a couple thousand visitors a day, or less, isn't worth the ad revenue. To generate those big numbers requires a site that is basically a giant drinks database and there are plenty of those already.

It should be noted that most of the big brands are well aware of the power of a well written blog and will often ply bloggers with free booze to unzip the posting zipper in an effort to get publicity. Then there's the endless stream of press releases, the vast majority irrelevant to our community. And really, this high-end cocktail community is very small compared to other online communities.

Then bloggers have to deal with pandas, Google Panda that is.

Google Panda was a major update to the Google search algorithm designed to enhance search results by placing quality content higher in the rankings. Sounds nice, but Google's digital idea of quality lacks refinement when it comes to drinks. When Panda rolled out, Art of Drink got slaughtered. Where the site previously ranked in the top 10 for many cocktail search terms, like the Margarita, it now sits somewhere in the basement, never to be seen by impatient searchers again.

At Art of Drink's peak, it was getting about 5000 visitors per day or about 250,000 pageviews per month. Today it gets about a quarter of that. If you search for "Margarita Cocktail" the first page of results in Google shows About.com cocktails 4 times (your search may vary depending on your Google data centre). That's right, About.com gets 4 out of 10 of the top results. Sounds odd, but it is not. Google reconfigured their search results for profit, and About.com uses a lot of Google ads. There is nothing inherently wrong with this, most bartenders will happily give their best customers better service because those are the people who pay the bills, ditto for Google. For bloggers, who are almost always independent to start, we rank very low no matter the quality of our content just because we lack size.

It should also be noted that one of Google's quality indicators is back-links. If I write an article and you put a link to that article on your website that is a back-link. At one time they were abundant, but as the cocktail community shrank, so did the back-links. Links have also become a type of Internet currency and nobody likes to give away something for free when they can barter for a reciprocal link. Anyone who has a blog has probably been solicited for back-links. Me, I just spread the love freely. Have a link Rocky, Dr. Bamboo and Rated R Cocktails.

Obviously, linking could also be a quality issue (i.e. the posts on Art of Drink, or any blog for that matter, don't warrant a back-link because they are low quality). Without back-links it is almost impossible to rank highly in Google which means few people actually read those articles. For new bloggers this is a huge challenge as the cocktail community isn't really involved with blogs anymore.

Another Google quality indicator would be social media. A post that gets many comments, retweets or Facebook Likes might rank higher in the search results. Again, retweets are hard to come-by unless explicitly requested. There are bartending personalities that do generate a social media response, like Jeffrey Morgenthaler but overall it is hit and miss.

Having a weak online cocktail community impedes the growth of our industry (i.e. quality drinks) creating a type of hipster bubble. The reason is that people searching online for a drink recipe will more than likely find the ones we've been trying to kick to the curn and replace with better quality ones.

Back in 2008 I could publish a post and within 24 hours have over 800 people view the article. Now I'm lucky if 250 people read the article in 72 hours. This may actually be a sign of success. Instead of people reading about these once mythical cocktail creations, they may very well be enjoying them at a nearby bar. If that is the case, and there is evidence to support this conclusion, then I'd be very happy as vicarious existence can never beat the real experience.

I'll continue to write on Art of Drink, as I'm the proverbial bagholder when it comes to trends. I'm the guy who is infinitely optimisitc in the face of overwhelming odds. First there was that Corel stock thing, then the whole Movable Type blog platform, and then there is my fondness for Blackberry devices and I love Olympus cameras. I'm like the grim reaper of technology.

I can understand why so many bloggers have retired. Much of the low hanging fruit has been plucked off the blogging tree and to retain a readership one must constantly raise the bar. After the easy posts, it gradually gets harder to put together an interesting article and there are only so many times you can write a spirit review that states "hints of oak and vanilla" before you become sick of yourself. Then there is the fact that you offer your writing for free but still have to deal with those annoying Internet trolls.

For those that don't have aspirations to become a writer, they can now socialize in a bar with talented bartenders instead of staring at a computer screen visualizing great cocktails. It's a lot more fun to drink one.

I have recieved advice from the ulumni of the cocktail community throughout my blogging tenure which keeps me motivated to write, albeit at a diminished level. To paraphrase, they've told me to "do what I do and ignore everything else". Good advice. I  have two young kids who take up a lot of my time, so writing has become much harder for me, but I'll continue to write because I enjoy it.

I can say this, the cocktail topic is one where bloggers, book authors (Beachbum Berry, David Wondrich, Ted Haigh, Wayne Curtis, gaz regan, Dale Degroff, Jared Brown & Anistatia Miller and many others), bar owners / bartenders (Audrey Saunders, Sasha Petraske, Tony Conigliaro, Jamie Boudreau, Jeffrey Morgenthaler, etc.) as well as spirit producers / distillers / ambassadors (e.g. Eric Seed, G'Vine Gin, Simon Ford, Philip Duff etc.), magazines like Imbibe and Mixology and events like Tales of the Cocktail, actually changed the world of drinks. Before these people, the cocktail world was pretty bleak. There is still a lot of work to do, but this group of people has worked side-by-side to make drinks more enjoyable. Sure, it's not world peace, but they have produced millions of smiles and an equal amount of laughs, which is a step in the right direction.

Cocktail blogging may be dead, but it did effected change which can be seen in bars all over the world. Long live the cocktail blog!

Camper English04/10/2012

Well said - and thanks for the 411 on Google Panda. Very interesting. 

Rocky Yeh04/10/2012

Very much agreed on all of the low hanging fruit being gone, that’s why I post things like the 7 Deadly Jenns the one or twice a year  I post anything any more.

Darcy O'Neil04/10/2012

No problem Camper and good point Rocky, same reason I wrote the “Bourbon Box” post, instead of reviewing the Knob Creek Barrel Proof Bourbon. Something different, more creative and less typical.

Camper English04/10/2012

On the other hand, it seems you’re saying cocktail blogging is dead because you get less traffic. 

Darcy O'Neil04/10/2012

 Less traffic because people are probably out at bars. But “dead” because the amount of effort to write a good post takes too much time, so I write less. A key thing about blogs is to write regularily, which you do very well.

Nick04/10/2012

I think you are spot on in a lot of ways. I think the main challenge is that it really is a small community. 

I just had a long discussion yesterday about how restaurant bloggers are pretty jealous of cooking bloggers because the audience is just so much larger for cooking blogs. A lazy post about cooking at home will almost always get more traction than a beautifully executed restaurant review. 

While success may have lead to reduced readership because more people are enjoying great cocktails at their local bar, hopefully this success will lead to the growth of the community and more demand for great cocktail blogs. 

Just as we’ve seen a renewed interest in cooking in the US, hopefully the success of great cocktail bars will lead more people to want to learn to make cocktails at home. It’s easy to imagine seeing an increase in classic and creative cocktails supplementing wine and beer offerings at parties. 

@Treasure_MA

Nick04/10/2012

I think you are spot on in a lot of ways. I think the main challenge is that it really is a small community. 
I just had a long discussion yesterday about how restaurant bloggers are pretty jealous of cooking bloggers because the audience is just so much larger for cooking blogs. A lazy post about cooking at home will almost always get more traction than a beautifully executed restaurant review. 
While success may have lead to reduced readership because more people are enjoying great cocktails at their local bar, hopefully this success will lead to the growth of the community and more demand for great cocktail blogs. 
Just as we’ve seen a renewed interest in cooking in the US, hopefully the success of great cocktail bars will lead more people to want to learn to make cocktails at home. It’s easy to imagine seeing an increase in classic and creative cocktails supplementing wine and beer offerings at parties. 

As
with so many parties in life, I was late to this one. I started my
website, Professor Cocktail, just over a year ago. I had some
thoughts that I wanted to share with people, and I started writing
about them. I’ve been writing for a long time, so I didn’t have any
expectations of making money off of it. I just wanted to have a
little fun.

I’ve
been pleased with the way the site has grown, with readership going
up every month. But it’s definitely an uphill battle. There are so
many sites now, and so many places offering cocktail/spirits
information, that it’s a real challenge to attract an audience.
Everyone is carving the pie into smaller and smaller pieces, which
gives writers less of an incentive to put the time and effort into
generating valuable content.

I
agree with Angus Winchester that most cocktail blogs suck. There are
very few that I find worthwhile to read on a regular basis—and
most of those (with just a few exceptions like Camper’s and David
Driscoll’s very useful sites) are semi-dormant at best.

One
of the main problems, I think, is that so many of the people doing
it, even those with valuable information to share, just aren’t very
good writers. They either don’t have the ability or they don’t have
the desire to organize their thoughts into a cogent, coherent whole,
and then express those thoughts in an elegant way.

I
know that sounds harsh, but I think it’s something we need to
recognize. I also think that if cocktail writers would up their game
—and I don’t exclude myself from this—there *is* a large and
growing audience to find. People are more interested in cocktails and
spirits than they have been in many years. If writers produce quality
content that appeals to those people, I see no reason to think that
they won’t have success.

Totally agree that blogging has changed since its original intention to just give an honest opinion. Seems no one really does that anymore (not just cocktail blogging but food blogging as well). I’ve gotten on a soapbox myself about how now it seems that a lot of people have gotten into blogging just so they can get the free stuff and will sell their blogs’ soul for it. Really giving bloggers a bad name.

Cocktail Rick04/10/2012

I think there’s a bit of a chicken and egg scenario going on here.  Myself, you, Morgenthaler, and a few others all linked to one another quite a bit when we first started blogging on Blogspot, et al.  We wrote quick posts and people were happy.

We kind of forced each other to write more well-researched posts and thus, we ended up writing posts more for each other (and those “in the know”) than we did for the consumer.  Most of the posts nowadays wouldn’t play in Peoria.

I think we forgot who we were writing for, the consumer, and as a result, they stayed away in droves.  A pediatric heart surgeon doesn’t want to hear about the maceration process of specific herbs as we try to re-discover the right proportions for the fabled blue chartreuse.  They just want to know if it’s good or not.  They want to be told when something sucks.  They put hearts in to little kids, so sorry if they don’t understand the Louche effect.  

I think most “bloggers” have driven people away much as bartenders are having to learn that hospitality comes first, not great cocktails from the 1890’s.  If you want the traffic back, think to yourself what every great marketer has to ask, “Will it play in Peoria?”  

So, I say, if you want to become a writer and pontificate on the best way to get clear ice, then go do it.  Research the hell out of stuff and write that article and people like Angus Winchester will give you your much-deserved affirmations.  Me?  I’m going to remember that this business is so supposed to be about forgetting shit.  Having fun.  Standing on bars and yelling poetry at people.  I won’t get the Writer of the Year award at Tales, but I’ll get to hang with the guy that does and we’ll drink the same stuff and have some great big bro-hugs by the end of the night.  Do you really need anything else?  

Matt Robold04/10/2012

Totally agree on the low-hanging fruit. I pretty much only write when something really grabs me these days. I’ve dropped the reviews because I got tired of being told how wrong I was to like or not like something or to get samples followed by daily emails asking when I was going to write something about the samples.

I’ve basically rechanneled  my energies into Rum Society in LA, working at 320 Main, the occasional consulting with very, very tiny brands, and just fucking enjoying the people I’ve met rather than engaging in the rat-race of clicks and pageviews.

Incidentally, my traffic, despite the staleness of the site, has plateaued by remained consistent over the past 18 months, so I seem to have survived the great Pandaing.

Darcy O'Neil04/10/2012

 We did create the “beast” but Morgenthaler and I both targeted bartenders, not the general public, as our audience. I still do and it seems to be a successful niche, when I write about scientific things.

Dave Stolte04/10/2012

A fascinating read - thanks, Darcy. Very interesting about Panda. What was Google’s mantra about “don’t be evil?”

Dg Blackburn04/10/2012

Amen…

Camper English04/10/2012

Honestly, the cocktail blogs that get the most hits are the worst ones, about “skinny” cocktails, and celebrity drink news. My own blog has more and more an industry focus, so I’ve specialized at the cost of newbie cocktailian clicks, but I guess I don’t mind. 

Camper English04/10/2012

My soul is relatively inexpensive, in case any brands are reading this.

Camper English04/10/2012

I think that a lot (actually, all on this thread) of us have the option of doing other things to make money, and nothing makes less money than blogging. So writing Cocktail 101 stuff over and over is not interesting and not needed for income. I am only in this game to gain and share knowledge, if I ever feel I’ve learned it all it would be time to move on. 

Cocktail Rick04/10/2012

My response certainly isn’t a knock on you, I hope you didn’t take it that way.  To the contrary, if you can make money doing it, why wouldn’t you?  You’re like a pro baseball player, you get to get paid doing what you love.  Never a bad thing.

It’s more about the reason why blogging has died out and I submit it’s because we forgot about our audience which is to say, the people that don’t read the articles and don’t want to get in-depth, they just want some info in their day and move on.  

JordanDevereaux04/10/2012

While I am a tiny, tiny fish in this admittedly small pond, even I’ve noticed that I get more traffic on my posts about whisk(e)y now than I do for my cocktail posts.  Though for whatever reason people still really want to know how to make orgeat.

K(ate) Muse04/10/2012

All due respect to my blogging betters, but maybe a redefinition of the point of cocktail blogging may be necessary at this juncture? Even a little over a year ago when my interest in serious cocktails developed, the low hanging fruit was indeed well-covered and it wouldn’t have occurred to me to re-iterate what others had done (and much better than I could do). My reaction to the wealth of information, both on blogs and new recipes and techniques being promoted by bars (on Twitter, in magazines, etc..), was to synthesize and create. I took an angle of cocktails-as-art-medium for my blog. No comment on the success of the recipes or writing, but even while developing on all fronts I’ve tried to push ideas, including link-backs to sources of inspiration wherever possible.

Are there ways to promote all your archives? There’s a lot there, the value of which extends well beyond having been posted this-very-day or randomly popping up in a search. I’d love to be able to dig in and pore through them, but time is a limiting factor so I don’t have a good idea of what gems I’ve been missing out on.

Matthew Rowley04/10/2012

Were I to read cocktail blogs, I’d probably read this one. It seems ok for, you know, a blog. 

I’m beginning to understand how Rick Grimes felt in The Walking Dead; I’m questioning why I even bother, the ranks of my writing friends are greatly reduced, and the drone of hordes of seemingly brain-dead writers that have taken their place is enough to drive me to despair.

The noise ratio from cocktail blogs has gotten so bad that I rarely read them anymore. Oh, I’ll follow an interesting link from Twitter and a handful of blogs remain that I check once every week or three. The standards have dropped so low, however, that the entire genre is poisoned by it; the breathless regurgitation of press releases, the repetition of disproven “facts” about spirits, the sheer unthinking and uncritical and bad writing that bleeds over from overly casual Facebook-style updates is just disheartening. I won’t go so far as to claim the Pinterest killed the cocktail blog, but the moment my eye lands on a spirits piece that uses “fab,” “delish,” “yum-o,” or other Rachel Ray-isms, I leave. There’s just a horrible, vintage-filtered sameness about it all. In the words of Sweet Brown, ain’t no one got time for that.

I was an author and writer before I started blogging and the Whiskey Forge remains primarily advertisement for me, keeping my name at or near the top for particular topics. From that I get paying client work. I thought long and hard about just retiring the blog earlier this year from sheer exhaustion and, frankly, my own disinterest; yes, the low-hanging fruit is picked, our voices are drowning out among the noise, and time spent writing *good* content for free may be more profitably spent on writing projects that keep my lights on, help me pay the mortgage, and all the hundreds of expenses a grown-ass adult must meet — and then, out of the blue, a call comes in from someone who heard me on an NPR interview, then found a Wired interview online, and liked my writing. Hired me for an editing gig wholly unrelated to spirits writing and paid me more for a month’s work than I typically make in three years of royalty checks.

Will I keep the blog up? Sure. Shoot, maybe I’ll even revamp it and give the old girl a refresh. Maybe. But I know it will never turn a profit and sometimes I stare at the screen blankly, wholly at a loss for one single relevant, entertaining, and truthful thing to write. 

And then I start typing because I remember; I like seeing my name in print. 

On checks.

Darcy O'Neil04/10/2012

 That would have made a nice Foreword to my post. And I agree, too much noise, but the words I’ve posted on Art of Drink are too valuable to give up on. It is a great promotional tool for Fix the Pumps and the future book number two. And thanks for reading, you know, a blog.

Drink Spirits04/10/2012

<removed></removed>

Drink Spirits04/10/2012

Yes the early adopter phase of all this has come and gone. It’s easy to do a blog when it doesn’t take that much effort to reach people, but the cocktail universe has gone from a relatively small group to a much larger national scale. The relevancy for cocktail blogs hasn’t diminished, the needs of the readers have changed. So cocktail bloggers need to either adapt or move on.

I’ve been writing online since before the term blog ever existed and these cycles of boom and bust are absolutely typical. It’s no shock that it’s happening on this front. The bottom line, if you want to be more than a casual blogger it takes a crapload of work and the understanding that you’ll always face dumb comments from smart people on what you do. (yes I was referring to Angus).

James Rodewald04/10/2012

Way to go guys. You kill print and now you wander away from the gun. Kidding, sort of, but the lack of booze ads is nothing new. While I was Drinks Editor at Gourmet (before y’all killed it in 2009) we did a fair amount of cocktail stuff online, including a project that entailed going through every issue since the beginning (1941), picking the most interesting cocktails from each decade, reshooting them, reprinting the recipe, and writing a little story about each one (still online, though with less functionality). The art dept. did (IMO) an incredible job with this, and all in all I thought it was pretty darn good (for my part, almost entirely done on my own time because, you know, the web is the future). But when you went to any recipe or decade, the ads that came up were ALL house ads. Mostly asking you to subscribe to Bon Appetit. I never was able to get to the bottom of this. Was there no liquor company that wanted, at any price, to be alongside the best cocktails from 70 years of Gourmet? Did anyone pitch any of them? I have no clue.

And as for Google’s algorithm, the only post I recall getting any traction did so because it had a throw-away line about a group of bartenders getting on a bus that happened to have a stripper pole to go visit Tuthilltown. Why did it get picked up by Google News? Well, I traced it back to an adult video site that had a robot that presumably had “stripper” programmed into it. So even though it was kind of a nothing piece, it got a lot of traffic. This, for me, goes to the heart of the issue: quality. Some of the blogs definitely have it, others don’t. But it’s unclear to me whether quality matters in the current environment. My hope is that at some point people will be willing to pay for quality, that years of experience, hundreds of conversations, thousands of dead brain cells, and a deep Rolodex will again count for something. In the meantime I’ll continue to enjoy the well-researched and well-written posts I come across and regret that so few people will stumble on them. Gourmet had its highest circulation when it was shut down so clearly something was and is broken. Print is for advertisers, not readers. Sadly, blogs are for readers but seem to be nearly impossible to monetize. If I had the answer I wouldn’t be reading your blog, I’d be partying with Zuckerberg. Hmm, perhaps I am better off doing the honest work of slinging drinks for an appreciative audience.

Ron Diggity04/10/2012

Twitter took most of what little writing energy I had, but paradoxically, lately I’ve decided to get back to investing in my site.  I think there are things that a site can do that a Twitter / Facebook feed cannot, particularly in the realm of curation and aggregation.

It’s also representative of how the web is used at large.  More and more content has to be 1) mobile, and 2) local.  Add to that the fact that mobile site design is intrinsically different than desktop site design, particularly mobile sites viewed in dank, dark bars with poor reception.

Kerry Deane-Cloutier04/10/2012

“to retain a readership one must constantly raise the bar.” 
No, all you have to do is write well, and actually post every now and then.

First off, great post. I hope that the success of this post
doesn’t generate copycats. Like all good doomsday articles, you start with the
fear, “the golden days are gone,” and move on to some very true and accurate thoughts
about the state of online cocktail culture. Maybe you’re right that the golden
age of cocktail blogging is behind us just like many people would argue that
the golden age of cocktails is behind us, but we’ve sure as hell seen some
amazing cocktailing happen in the past decade. I think we’ll see the same kind
of effort put forth by those coming into the online cocktail fold.

 

You are absolutely right about blogging. Blogging is tough,
and if you’re doing it for anything other than your own personal satisfaction,
then you’re in the wrong online hobby. Why each individual starts blogging is
only known by them, but whatever the reason, we should be encouraging them to
blog and create content. I think what you’re describing is an echo chamber. Perhaps
the low hanging fruit has been picked over by the farmers, but it has barley
been looked at by regular folks.

 

I’d guess that 99 out of 100 I talk to about cocktails don’t
know when to stir or shake. If I want a good cocktail I still have to go to
very specific bars. If mid-2000s goals of bloggers were to educate other
cocktail enthusiasts, then mission accomplished. And that is great if it was,
but if people have any desire to keep evangelizing cocktails, then we have a
long ways to go my friend. The audience has shifted and you need to tailor your
content to the audience you want to target.

 

Just as the audience has shifted, so too has the delivery
method. Honestly, who cares about Google’s Panda. Sure it cuts down on traffic,
but at the same time, Google has started to give more relevance to social
media. I’m just starting a cocktail project and I’m not going to even use a
website. I’m doing all social media.

 

I think you got a lot right in this post, but I
think you are coming from a “been there, done that” viewpoint, and you probably
have. Just as with all hobbies, there is an ebb and flow of interest, which is
why they are called hobbies.

First off, great post. I hope that the success of this post doesn’t generate copycats. Like all good doomsday articles, you start with the fear, “the golden days are gone,” and move on to some very true and accurate thoughts about the state of online cocktail culture. Maybe you’re right that the golden age of cocktail blogging is behind us just like many people would argue that the golden age of cocktails is behind us, but we’ve sure as hell seen some amazing cocktailing happen in the past decade. I think we’ll see the same kind of effort put forth by those coming into the online cocktail fold.

You are absolutely right about blogging. Blogging is tough, and if you’re doing it for anything other than your own personal satisfaction, then you’re in the wrong online hobby. Why each individual starts blogging is only known by them, but whatever the reason, we should be encouraging them to blog and create content. I think what you’re describing is an echo chamber. Perhaps the low hanging fruit has been picked over by the farmers, but it has barley been looked at by regular folks.

I’d guess that 99 out of 100 I talk to about cocktails don’t know when to stir or shake. If I want a good cocktail I still have to go to very specific bars. If mid-2000s goals of bloggers were to educate other cocktail enthusiasts, then mission accomplished. And that is great if it was, but if people have any desire to keep evangelizing cocktails, then we have a long ways to go my friend. The audience has shifted and you need to tailor your content to the audience you want to target.

Just as the audience has shifted, so too has the delivery method. Honestly, who cares about Google’s Panda. Sure it cuts down on traffic, but at the same time, Google has started to give more relevance to social media. I’m just starting a cocktail project and I’m not going to even use a website. I’m doing all social media.

I think you got a lot right in this post, but I think you are coming from a “been there, done that” viewpoint, and you probably have. Just as with all hobbies, there is an ebb and flow of interest, which is why they are called hobbies.

Dr. Bamboo05/10/2012

Thanks for the link! wink

Brant06/10/2012

Well said. Talk to ya later. I hate typing.

Helena Tiare Olsen21/10/2012

Well, i`d say both…As for me i`m still rolling but at a somewhat slower pace. I have always been writing because i enjoy it - but it`s a fact the lower fruits are long gone and it`s not as easy anymore to find new interesting topics. 

Luckily for me i`m nieched in the rum and tiki department and there´s always some rum to write about or a tiki drink to explore or at least i think so. As long as i enjoy it i`m gonna keep writing but i def have lost the energy i had in 2009….As far as traffic goes it´s still pretty much consistent - at least so far.

Darcy this is na great post!

Kris @bevmo08/11/2012

Hi there! We’re about to LAUNCH a blog about cocktails, wine, beer, parties, pairings, etc. We’d love to have you participate as a paid correspondent from time to time.
Shoot me an email if you’re interested. Kris Mulkey .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

bostonapothecary08/11/2012

i never even thought of trying to pick the low hanging fruit.  i’ve had a lot of fun with wild techniques, relating everything to art theory and amateur, highly suspicious neuroscience.

i think since i started i have become a much better writer. i’ve also become a better bartender. having an outlet has meant that i never had to bore anyone at work with my incessant flow of ideas.

i’ve generated a nice mountain of strange content but i never even had a second to sit down and learn to format wordpress or even add photos.

i always really enjoyed the artofdrink. well it was fun while it lasted. -stephen

Maud18/06/2013

<url>http://www.getacnetreatment.net/|how to get prescription accutane</url> 881542 <url>http://www.anystatecarinsurance.com/cheap-car-insurance-OH.html|Columbus cheap car insurance</url> 69540 <url>http://www.anystatecarinsurance.com/cheap-car-insurance-IL.html|cheap car insurance Illinois</url> %((( <url>http://www.jotorres.net/|cheap auto inshurince</url> objhgn <url>http://www.yourcarinsurancequotes.net/|infinity auto insurance</url> xipet <url>http://insuredcar.net/|car insurance quotes</url> wiveeo <url>http://www.klebergcountyairport.com/|deals on car insurance</url> :DDD

Submit Comment