Johnnie Walker Blue Label

Johnnie Walker Blue LabelThis is one of those spirits that either gets rave reviews or boo's and hisses. Some people think that the price point of Blue Label is a rip off, while others see that it represents something more than just the liquid in the bottle. It is true that Johnnie Walker Blue Label is a blended scotch, which automatically nix's this spirit from single malt snobs list of drinkable scotch. That's fine, too each their own, I say. But, if you keep an open mind, you might see more to this scotch than the price and grain spirit. Let's take a look at this from a neutral aspect and see if there really is value to this scotch.

I will admit now, that I do own a bottle of Blue Label and have sipped it many times. Prior to my entry into the bartending world, I was just a normal consumer with no experience in the unique world of scotch. When I became engaged, and started planning the wedding, I wanted it to be a great celebration, so I decided I'd buy a great bottle of scotch to make the moment memorable. In my quest for scotch, I realized that there were so many varieties and styles that I had no idea of where to start. However, I was aware of Johnnie Walker Red Label and had often seen the Black and Gold labels at the liquor store, each with an increase in price. So, I looked into Gold Label and came across a reference to Blue Label. As I did my research, Blue Label was represented as an epic scotch. I then went to Whisky Magazine and looked up the review on Blue Label. Michael Jackson gave it a 9¼ and described it as 'a lovely, luxurious whisky'. Meanwhile Dave Broom gave it a 9. It also was given the Editors Choice award. How could I argue with two whisky experts, Blue Label was my choice, even at $200 for the bottle.

jJohnnie Walker Blue LabelAt the heart of Blue Label is Royal Lochnagar, a rare malt distilled near Balmoral, the Queen's holiday home. Around 15 other mature and precious whiskies are added to balance Blue Label. On the nose Blue Label is exceptionally smooth, even if you take a very deep inhale, there is no harsh alcohol burn. There is a subtle aroma of smoke, tobacco and peat with a slight sweetness, almost fruity, that is quite enjoyable. On tasting you get a good shot of smoke with a little astringency and some good warmth in the mouth. The scotch clings to your tongue and the peatiness comes out with hints of bitterness, like bittersweet chocolate. There is a background of malt and after a minute the flavours still linger pleasantly on your tongue. It is a great scotch if you just appreciate it, as is. If you sit there, while tasting it, thinking to yourself "dam, this has grain spirits in it, this sucks" then you have already convinced yourself that Blue Label is not your thing. A good attitude will help when tasting anything, including food, wine or spirits.

A large part of buying Blue Label is that it represents more than just a fine scotch. I believe that the majority of people who buy this product are trying to impress someone. It can be given as the ultimate Christmas gift or served when entertaining. Sometimes, it is a sign of prosperity or self importance. Some people just like to buy the best, and Blue Label represents the perceived best, even though this may be through marketing efforts. It works for Grey Goose, and a couple dozen other premium vodkas. This attitude is no different than a malt snob huffing, in contempt, that they don't drink blends.

I like to make the parallel of a fine restaurant. A steak in a high end restaurant is generally no different than a steak at "Bob's Cookhouse." The steak, if graded triple AAA is going to cost about the same and be of good quality. Sure, a high class restaurant can order "special cows", but in reality, beef is beef and steak is steak. The main difference is the presentation and atmosphere. I can have a great steak at Bob's steakhouse, but sometimes you want a steak where you can impress someone or enjoy a different atmosphere. It's the tables, location, perks and attitude that you are paying for. Basically, marketing is the difference between a $12 AAA streak and a $35 AAA steak. Same goes for the Blue Label. You are paying the extra because Johnnie Walker markets their product to a high end consumer. They are doing the ground work to make the product special, so that if you do give it as a gift or share it with friends, your friends will know that you are being generous and kind. Most people couldn't tell the difference between a great scotch and a bad scotch to tell you the truth. As a bartender, I have managers who think that Johnnie Walker Red Label is a premium scotch.

At the end of the day, when you buy scotch, you are buying the rental fee for the aging process and the expertise of the master blender. When you buy Blue Label, you are paying for the crafting, along with the marketing. People purchase Blue Label because it represents an easily identifiable premium scotch. When I bought this scotch, that was my impression. However, I wasn't tainted by the opinion of people who said that it was over rated. My first impression was that this actually tasted pretty good for a scotch. I enjoyed it, my friends enjoyed it, even if they didn't like the taste, but they appreciated that I was trying to provide them with the best I could offer. This has value that many scotches just don't have.

Next review: Johnnie Walker Swing

43 Comments on Johnnie Walker Blue Label

By Rick Dobbs on March 10, 2006 1:03 PM

I know some who will berate Blue for the sake of being a purist and that's pretty week sauce. It's not a bad whisky at all. I think the problem comes from the concept that there are just better brands to give people for the money.

I understand your point about it being an easily identifiable premium label, but ultimately, this hurts the industry as a whole. It creates a generic feel to the brand that others have to start competing with, even if it means lowering quality in order to match it. Think Starbuck's. NOT good coffee, people.

Vodka has some leeway in this, imo, because the difference between "Premium" and "Super-Premium" brands is $10 bucks at most. Not $100.

And though I know where you were heading with your steak analogy, it's way off. Prime beef that is dry aged that you would get at a top-end steakhouse is a world apart from the Choice cut you get at most places. Find a store that sells Prime and then get a cut of Choice, cook them both the same (don't even worry about aging) and you'll see a significant difference.

You'd hate to see a blog about the fineries of meat oversimplify when they chatted about Scotch, doing it the other way doesn't work either.

By Lonnie Bruner on March 10, 2006 7:07 PM

Great article, Darcy. Much appreciated.

By Darcy O'Neil on March 10, 2006 7:53 PM

Hey Rick,

My steak analogy was a little weak, and I probably should have compared the bottle to the restaurant and the spirit to the food. But you get the point.

Someday I think scotch needs to be simplified. The majority of people buy based on price and have no idea what an Islay malt is, or how to pronounce it (eye-la). But then again, I'm no expert and usually I will just buy a bottle on a whim and see how it tastes. I'll be writing on this soon.

Darcy

p.s. thanks Lonnie

By bobby brown on March 28, 2007 9:02 PM

it is tasty stuff

By Shelly Samuel on April 11, 2007 9:31 AM

I have drank Johnnie Walker Blue and I have found it to be smooth and I want to know how I can purchase a bottle of the Blue and Green.

By John Walker on May 5, 2007 3:17 AM

I bought a bottle of Johnnie Walker Blue Label when i was in Houston and have only sipped at it a few times, most of my friends are horrified when the bottle comes out because they can not handle this stuff, i don't mind it but my favorate is still the Black Label.

By Tony Scicluna on June 29, 2007 1:34 PM

I agre with John Walker. Occasionally I have a sip of the blue, because of its smoothness, however I have to say that Black Label is the best Blend deluxe money can buy. Beats them all!!!!

By Bone on July 11, 2007 1:58 PM

The reason Johnny Blue cost so much is because several of the distilleries it drew its whiskeys from for its original blend are not making their products any more, for whatever reason. That is why you will see the price of this product go up steadily over time. I think when it hit my radar, it was $150 to $175 a bottle. Then it hovered at about $190 about 3 years or so ago. No it is at the $200, $210 mark. I et it will increase again shortly.

For what it is worth, I love this whiskey. I have never owned a bottle, but I treat my self to a sniffter once or twice a year at my favorite restaurants.

By nicola hunte on July 16, 2007 9:58 PM

can you tell me what year did Johnnie Walker Blue came out.

By Alessandro on July 24, 2007 1:46 PM

Blue Label is quite recent, I don't think it existed before the late 80's.

By Jeff on October 11, 2007 6:47 AM

This is a good and fair review. Props.

By Ken on October 13, 2007 2:31 PM

Good points. As a single malt enthusiast, I appreciate the regional and individual characteristics that make a good dram of whisky. That said, I enjoy a quality blend every now and then.

What I want to know is why Blue Label, which is supposed to pride itself as a superb combination of single malts, is not a vatted malt (i.e. without the colorless and odorless grain alcohol)?

Blue is limited production, and prices itself out of a high demand market, so why the dilution? Vatted malts are on the rise, and maybe JW would appeal to more single malt drinkers if they dropped the grain content.

By Gilbert Marchman on November 8, 2007 2:44 PM

I got a "Warrant of Appointment" in re: Johnnie Walker. Blue Label. King George V; what do I do now?

By John on November 9, 2007 3:55 PM

Though you would to know there is a new King in town King George V
made by Johnnie Walker. It's a Limited -edition (4000 Bottles) I have mine, Best yet.
Great Work Johnnie Walker

By Aaron W on November 15, 2007 8:29 PM

It tastes just like money!!!

AW

By JOE on November 18, 2007 7:45 PM

My friends and I just experienced Johnnie Walker Blue after a victorious Green Bay Packer game. We all agreed that it was extremely smooth and totally enjoyable. Worth the price.

By Greig on November 26, 2007 12:27 PM

One of the main reasons that the price of premium whiskey is skyrocketing is China. They have begun buying high end spirits in the last decade in quantities that outstrip supply. Johnny Blue is decent stuff, but if I had to plonk $200 on a single bottle, it'd be something else.

By Eddie on November 28, 2007 9:13 AM

King George V is actually Blue Label in a beautiful bottle.

I Love Blue Label and it's just a personal thing!

By Anabell on November 29, 2007 10:02 AM

I was introduced to JW Blue in 2000 at a Xmas party in Tokyo and have been an avid fan since. I had some prime Sake and quite a few shots of JWB and had to be at work at 0600 the next day. I made it without the slightest hint of a hangover. I may have been a wee bit inebriated but felt great the rest of the day. It has always been in my home and I pick it up at the airports during my travels for best cost and duty free ($130 - $160). Salud!

By Naman Singh on December 8, 2007 5:10 AM

Hi, Can someone please help me , i want to buy Blue Label KGV, but cant find it. If you know where i can buy one please please let me know

By Chase on December 9, 2007 11:32 AM

Anabell: grandwinecellar.com has the Johnny Walker KGV for US$549.99. Good Luck.

By Franklin on December 11, 2007 3:34 PM

I was given s case of JW blue, my grandfather gave it to me 10 years ago. This pass Thankgiving was my first time tasting JW Blue, one word....Perfect!

By Ed on December 14, 2007 12:50 PM

I have been drinking JW Blue for about 15 years. It is a smooth, no-nonsense scotch with absolutely no bite unlike JW red and Black. Ugh!! Another outstanding scotch is JW Swing, which I feel is underrated and most certainly underpriced at around $60/bottle. I have turned on many of my friends to JW Blue and Swing. In fact, I have to hide the bottles when they come over or else they'd drink me "bone dry." (LOL)
I used to get JW Blue from some of the duty-free stores when my friends went to Arruba and places like that. I would buy 4-6 bottles for about $118/bottle, but like everything else, those days are over. Is it worth $209/bottle currently? No, especially when a lot of that is tax, but at least once or twice a year, I bite the bullet and buy it. I drink it for pure pleasure, not to impress my friends. Give me a Macunudo Prince Phillip Maduro cigar and a glass of Blue, and I am in heaven!

By Patrick N. McVay on December 16, 2007 1:01 PM

Hello Gang:

I have not tasted it yet but I just got back from a trip to Mexico where I picked up a 5th of JW Blue for $110 USD and no taxes. I also got this monstrous 4.5 liter bottle of JW Black for $110 USD with a free bag. Can't wait to try them. God luck whisky shoppers.

By alf on December 20, 2007 10:33 AM

i just like to ask anyone knows what is on the bottle of blue label? me having a gamble with a friend he say blue label is 30 years. i knw red is 4, black is 12, green is 15 & gold is 18 but dun know about blue label.thanks

Answer: Blue Label does not have an age statement, so you are all wrong. The general consensus though is that it is in the 25 year range, with much older whiskies included (it is a blend)

By Neil Thomson on December 24, 2007 10:29 PM

I have had a bottle of Johnnie Walker Blue in my possesion for several years. It is boxed and has a seal. It also has a special number X48997JW on the label (limited edition?). Are you able to tell me the significance of this, and what is its value?

By Kalman on December 26, 2007 2:34 PM

Alf look here:

http://www.johnniewalker.com/en-us/OurLabels

Neil:

All JW blue have a unique number on the label and are sealed so you know it is authentic.

By Gopi Chand on January 14, 2008 9:31 PM

I wonder if the "blue label" scotch would taste the same when served out of a "red label" bottle. Something to experiment with friends. Here's what I'd do. Buy a bottle each of "red label" and "blue label" and swap the contents before serving. See which one tastes better.

By Cordell on May 29, 2008 10:12 AM

What a great blog and response section. I was recently turned on to JWB in Savhannaket, Lao. JWB is ridiculously inexpensive there(if you are an american). I did shots with the owner of the Hotel we stayed at and was not impressed....but that was at 0900 in the morning under severe diress to keep up with the man!
I am now in Bahrain and just purchased a bottle at our exchange here for 150 bones and will/am sharing it with rookies as well (me being one to), we all like beer.
since i did shots earlier i thought this would NOT be an appropriate way to down this beverage- i paid for it! So i added ice for our first drink before i had an epiphany to look on the internet and see what some of the pro's recommend for consuming.
My buddy and i just opened up the bottle and took our first drink with ice and both thought this was an exceptionally smooth drink. since we are rookies, we are now going to try without the ice.....its very smooth. the ice took a little of the signifcance out of the taste but that would be expected. so we are now wondering whats next. I think i like the ice because it brings a refreshment factor-its 100 F!@#ing degrees here in the desert. Sorry for the curse word but it is what it is!
I am close to a military retirement and would like to have a A++++ scotch whiskey at my party, what are the other great scotches out there? JWB is know by all and i saw earlier a "swift"(?). would like to hear other opinions on this.
lastly Darcy, you provided me with a great opinion and i want to give you your props.
cheers,
bucket

By Darcy O'Neil on May 30, 2008 7:58 PM

Thanks. I'm glad you enjoyed the article. Cheers

By Richard on June 8, 2008 4:21 PM

I was googling Blue Label when I came across this site. Just wanted to shar that I finally tried Blue Label at a Johnnie Walker event last night and I was.... not impressed at all. I would not pay more than $50 for what I drank. It was smooth to the point that I felt as if someone had watered it down for a first time drink. It lacked the flavor and spice of the other types they had an offer. I would pick any other Johnnie Walker label (other than red of course!) over the Blue.

By Enrico on June 19, 2008 8:25 PM

I tasted it several times on parties, when our host wanted to impress us with something extraordinary. It's a very good blended, but it cannot offer what a single malt can offer. In a few words, you can get much better at a lower price, if you really can appreciate it.

By Peter on October 1, 2008 10:31 AM

I have to say, I would have to disagree with you on a few key points in your article. First let me say, it is written very well and everyone has his or her own opinions, mine is different. This past summer, I decided to embark upon a little something I would like to call the "Johnny Walker Challenge." Over the course of a few weeks, a roommate and myself decided to get a true scotch experience with Johnny.

We first started out drinking Red, initially finding that this is no sipping scotch. Next we went onto a bottle of Black. This was much more smooth, with a little price bump. Our anticipation of tasting Blue was growing with each day. Next we had a bottle of Green, Johnny Walkers single malt scotch. It was very different from Black, different but still very good. It had a little more harshness than Black, but in a refined way. Next we enjoyed a bottle of Gold. This was a totally different experience. I have never had a liquor that was so smooth and Smokey on the pallet. It was warm and comforting when sipped. A truly great scotch. Next was finally what we were waiting for, Blue Label.

Now first let me say how different this is from Red, Black and Green. It is similar to Gold, but only at first. This scotch is meant to be drunk at room temperature, with no ice. This scotch cannot be watered down. If I could drink Blue all the time I would. Other scotches cannot compare. I suggest that at least once everyone experience Blue Label.

As far as the steak analogy, I again cannot agree with this. I love steak, the two best steaks I have ever had have been from Don Shulas and Morton’s. If you say there is no difference from these steaks and a steak from The Outback, I feel sorry for you.

But again, I would like to say very well written article, and one that invokes emotion. That is a sign of good writing. Thanks.

-Pete

By matt on October 24, 2008 11:20 PM

thank you for this information. I am going to buy a buddy of mine a bottle for his wedding... no less then blue for my best friend.

By B Money on November 27, 2008 11:01 PM

I first purchased a bottle of JWB on a cruise ship as a gift for my cousin's wedding. It cost only $100 as there was no tax...and I purchased it with the intention of giving the finest scotch to a great man. While I have not tried this prestigious beverage myself, after reading this article, I am curious to learn if I have been the victim of ingenious marketing, or if in fact, this scotch lives up to its name & reputation. I have emailed my cousin to see whether or not he enjoyed it. I have a feeling that he did not research its value and rather simply enjoyed this scotch for what it is. I am 100% certain he will give me his honest opinion as to whether or not it was a great scotch or rather completely overpriced shite. I am very curious to see what he will have to say. I will say that Darcy's article was an eye opener into the world of scotch. Being a novice, I am certain that scotch is one of those subjects where the more you learn about it, the more you realize you don't know. His use of the comparison to steak is evident of that...at first, I fully understood the point Darcy was trying to make....however, after reading the responses, it is evident that even the world of steak has it's intricate complexities. Regardless, it was a well written review and came across as genuine, honest and "real" compared to several other consumer review articles which seem to be written by corporate stakeholders. I am certain that many of you are in search of the perfect scotch, as I am...but until that euphoric day, I say we should savor and enjoy every single drop of the journey....especially when it is shared with good company! It is obviously one of mankind's greatest inventions and a symbol what it means to truly enjoy and appreciate something. Long live scotch! =)

By Rocky Korchinski on December 27, 2008 6:22 PM

Several years ago I had a glass of Scotch with a friend of mine. He was a scotch drinker and it was the very first time I tried it. It was not a good experience for me and I have not had a glass since, that is, until two days ago. I treated myself to a bottle of JW Blue for the holidays. I had another friend over who is also a scotch drinker and him and I had a glass. I went onto the JW website and found out their recommendations on how to enjoy it the best way. They say to cool your tongue with ice water just before you sip it so I got some artesian water (from Fiji) and make ice. I also use the same water over the ice, the purpose was that the local water has a taste and I did not want it to contaminate the taste of the Blue Label. (I also bought Waterford Crystal bandy snifters and water glasses, but that was to mostly add to the ambiance).

I had my friend open the bottle and pour. Then I asked him to have a sip and give me his opinion. He was very impressed, considering that he had never had it before and buys less expensive scotch. He had another sip and gave a very good description of how it tasted and how it compared to other scotchs he has had.

It was now my turn so I had a sip of water, then a sip of Scotch.

It has been said that all taste is personal, but that good taste can be defined. I know enough about wine to see the truth in that.

My experience of JW Blue Label is a conjunction of both personal taste and the definition of Good Taste.

It was magnificent. It pleased me indescribably, but I can also see that it is something that would please almost anyone with a taste for Scotch.

I will enjoy this bottle, but mostly with Scotch drinkers as that is the main point of buying one.

The price point ($250) is not something that concerns me, as I am sure I spend that much money on coffee in two months. I am going to get a bottle of King George V and put it away for when I am done with the current bottle, and even at $600 a bottle it is simple an indulgence, or as Joe Cocker wrote, A Luxury I can Afford.

No, it is the leather chairs and the den that is going hurt the pocket book. I can see doing this, but only doing it, if I do it well.

By Lumpy from Captain Cardiac and the Coronaries (50's/60's Rock n Roll band) on January 12, 2009 10:47 PM

It was great reading this feedback on one of our most memorable choices of Scotch. It has become a tradition to drink to each other's birthdays (we have 3 of Scottish descent and 3 Italians). The first Blue Label event was magical. Drank it straight. A warmth and presence that proceeded from the mouth up through the top of my head (head chakra ?); an effect, I am sure that not everyone experienced and I have not experienced since. Nontheless, everyone was IMPRESSED. Such is the mystical experience of the first time ! ! How I came upon Blue Label was through the TV series West Wing where Leo (his character is a recovering alcholic) is presented with Blue Label during a large campaign contribution negotiation. Now what could possibly lure Leo to take a drink ? He was so reverent about Blue Label. Got the answer after our first bottle. ! ! ! Anyway, we have explored other Scotches and it has been a fun journey. May the Scotch be with you !

By Dominik MJ - opinionated alchemist on March 13, 2009 5:10 PM

Hi Darcy,

I just came across your site when I looked for Blue Label!
It is a brilliant article - even when it was written couple years ago!

Well for me Blue Label is a good Scotch - however I cannot forget the price tag! [I don't make differences of the value between malts and blends - unlike others here I know, that even the grain whisky has to be aged in excess to end up with a so precious product].
If you would offer me a dram, I surely wouldn't say no! Though [despite the fact that I am not so much a Scotch lover - and if Scotch I prefer the uniqueness of malts] Gold Label is for me a very good deal!
Much less expensive I almost dare to say that it is on the same level as its big brother. Not as old, but defintely as refined...

By Mitch on March 24, 2009 11:47 PM

I finally tried the blue after years and years. I guess I might be called a single malt snob for no reason other than those are the ones I have liked the best, mainly up to now, Glenlivet 18. I've sipped blue recently and it was not bad, maybe it need a touch of water or ice, but not bad at this price...155 a bottle is unfortunately not acceptable. I tried Johnnie Green a blend of 15 yr old single malts and I had a hard time becuase it mixed so many flavors. I guess that drinking a lot of single malts has honed my taste to that type of scotch so that drinking any kind of blend confuses my taste buds ? It is worthwhile to note that there are many single malts with huge peat taste or huge smoke taste that I stay away from too.
The fun part is to keep trying

By matt on June 3, 2009 7:53 PM

For those that think Blue Label is over priced or just a fancy label for the upper market I challenge you to take a wooden cask of whiskey and store it for 20 plus years, open it up after it has set for this long and then come back here and tell me it is over priced....between the evaporation and what is sucked up into the wood you do not have alot of whisky left in the barrel...Just like every other bottle of scotch at the liquor store it is being sold for profit. So the same size barrel that a 7 year scotch comes out producing many bottles, a 25 year scotch makes a whole lot less not to mention the space taken up by aging cask...do you also realize that the guy who filled the barrel is not going to be the guy who opened the barrel. There is alot that goes into aging whiskey and so as cost to produce go up so does the bottle cost...YOU STILL GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR IN THIS WORLD PERIOD. I also challenge any single malt snob to take one of the Johnnie Walker tastings if it comes to your area you will change your mind about single malt and blended....

By Richard on June 4, 2009 6:30 PM

I did go to one of those tastings, it did NOT change my mind about blended whisky.

While Blue Label certainly does deserve to demand a high price for it's rarity, I don't think the taste warrants it. Unless Johnnie Walker watered down the samples they gave out.

By René on August 5, 2009 6:44 AM

Quote "By Rocky Korchinski on December 27, 2008 6:22 PM

Several years ago I had a glass of Scotch with a friend of mine. He was a scotch drinker and it was the very first time I tried it. It was not a good experience for me and I have not had a glass since, that is, until two days ago. I treated myself to a bottle of JW Blue for the holidays. I had another friend over who is also a scotch drinker and him and I had a glass. I went onto the JW website and found out their recommendations on how to enjoy it the best way. They say to cool your tongue with ice water just before you sip it so I got some artesian water (from Fiji) and make ice. I also use the same water over the ice, the purpose was that the local water has a taste and I did not want it to contaminate the taste of the Blue Label. (I also bought Waterford Crystal bandy snifters and water glasses, but that was to mostly add to the ambiance).

I had my friend open the bottle and pour. Then I asked him to have a sip and give me his opinion. He was very impressed, considering that he had never had it before and buys less expensive scotch. He had another sip and gave a very good description of how it tasted and how it compared to other scotchs he has had.

It was now my turn so I had a sip of water, then a sip of Scotch.

It has been said that all taste is personal, but that good taste can be defined. I know enough about wine to see the truth in that.

My experience of JW Blue Label is a conjunction of both personal taste and the definition of Good Taste.

It was magnificent. It pleased me indescribably, but I can also see that it is something that would please almost anyone with a taste for Scotch.

I will enjoy this bottle, but mostly with Scotch drinkers as that is the main point of buying one.

The price point ($250) is not something that concerns me, as I am sure I spend that much money on coffee in two months. I am going to get a bottle of King George V and put it away for when I am done with the current bottle, and even at $600 a bottle it is simple an indulgence, or as Joe Cocker wrote, A Luxury I can Afford.

No, it is the leather chairs and the den that is going hurt the pocket book. I can see doing this, but only doing it, if I do it well."

> I fully agree with you, Rocky! Nice comment, because I think I understand your feelings in this little story.
I'm a malt whiskylover, scotch, irish and japanese, who also loves (lots of) blended whiskies. But, I don't like those reviews, that say "oh, Johnnie Walker Blue Label, well, it's just a blended and I'll have to pay 250 dollars for this liquid, which isn't worth it. I do love the Green more or whatsoever. For that money I can buy..... malt whisk(e)y!"
I hate it(the review, not the person!)
This JWB is great, realy great. Take your time, nose and nose and nip this dram and discover the jewels in this miracle between others!

Well , I better leave it by that and take a dram.

By Lawrence on August 23, 2009 4:09 PM

Some of you Scotch drinkers need to do a little research. I am a JW Striding Man society member. 1. JW Green is NOT a single malt

2. JW Blue is a blend of whiskies in the 20, 30,40 ,50,60 year olds

3. It can't be compared to single malts it is a blend. compared to blends it is one of the best.

4. To drink it is not mixed or on the rocks. It is drunk neat, after cooling
the mouth with some chards of ice and ice water mix. Then enjoy a nice
large sip, let it savor in your mouth.swallow while inhaling like with a
fine wine. It will appear extremely smooth. repeat until your generous
portion is finish. Pour in a brandy or cognac glass to serve. Have been
to various JW tastings, enjoying all the blends, red,black,green, gold,
blue....swing is an entirely different animal. Spicey, with a bite and
was originally designed like an OL' time scotch like it was served on
30's cruises the bottle is stored on a metal swing that sways with the
waves of the ocean.

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